Drug Induced Rape

The following is from my book Redeem The Silence; an Unintended Journey:

Suzie was at her sister’s house for a pool party.  A friend of her sister’s was there with a brother who lived out of state.  He slipped a Rohypnol drug into her drink.  Suzie eventually felt the need to lie down, went into the house and lay down in one of the bedrooms.  Under the drug’s influence, she later became aware of someone on top her.  Trying desperately to bring herself to complete consciousness, she was unable to do so.  Other than the sensation of someone on top her, she is unable to remember the rape or how her bathing suit and shorts were removed.  Two other guests discovered them in the bedroom.  Courageously Suzie took the man to court, identified by the witnesses.  In spite of their testimony, the rapist was acquitted because she had no memory of the incident.

Have you ever seen the movie In Laws?  It is a funny movie for the most part.  One scene is serious though.  Michael Douglas’ character has kidnapped his son’s future father-in-law.  The drugged kidnap victim wakes up only to find himself on an airplane with Douglas’ character in flight off to who-knows-where.  Realizing he’s been drugged, he looks at Douglas and exclaims “Oh no! You didn’t give me Roofies did you?  Are you going to rape me?”

Stop and consider a moment.  Why was it necessary to treat lightly something as deadly as a rape drug?  Did the knock-out drug need to be identified?  It wasn’t funny to me that a joke was made about Roofies and rape.  Date rape drugs are a deadly serious topic and can also be deadly.

Definition: Drug-induced rape is different than intoxication rape that happens when a woman becomes intoxicated of her own free will with a rapist who then takes advantage of the situation.  The commonly used misnamed “date-rape” drugs are different; deserving a category all their own because these hideous drugs are  being used to rape women in a uniquely sinister way.  They can make the victim appear to be the one initiating sexual activity, they can completely block out memory, they leave the body within a few hours so are difficult to detect for prosecution, and they are easily assessable and easily slipped to the intended victim. 

  Recipes to make GHP drug from common legal substances ar easily available.  As I write there are 3,470 Internet hits for GHP, several of them including recipes.  The other category is known as “Roofies,” officially Rohypnol, less dangerous and less difficult to detect.  One drop of this drug is equivalent to nine drinks, and is easily concealed in water and eye-drop bottles.  The victim does not know what has happened to her and the drugs leave the system within 12 hours.  Rohypnol and GHP have been called “sexual assault” drugs because of their potential to cause blackouts and amnesia at high doses.  Several less common drugs used in sexual assault include ketamine (an anesthetic), “fry” (cigarettes or cigars combining marijuana, embalming fluid, and often PCP) and burundanga (also known as scopolamine, a light yellow powder derived from the Datura aroberea shrub  in Columbia).

More next time…..

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